Monteblanco Colombia

Monteblanco Colombia coffee farm

Monteblanco Purple Caturra Colombia is a complex coffee with a svelte  sweetness and tasting notes of pear and almond, with a syrupy sweet body. Our roast brings body with a silky texture, balanced acidity and a delicately tangy finish.

What’s Unique: A variety named “purple caturra” by family farm manager Rodrigo Sanchez Valencia due to the cherries on these coffee shrubs maturing a dark purple colour rather than the normal red ripe colour for the caturra cultivar.

Crop:  2018
Variety:  Purple Caturra
Elevation:  1730 meters
Region:  Huila
Producer:  Rodrigo Sanchez Valencia
Farm:  Finca Monteblanco
Process:  Washed
Fragrance:  Almond, brown sugar
Tasting notes:  Pear, lychee, praline
Price: 16.95 / 400g


About Finca Monteblanco:  located high along the winding mountain roads of Vereda La Toroca in the San Adolfo municipality above Pitalito, is a family farm managed by Rodrigo Sanchez Valencia in the tradition of coffee cultivation that began with his grandfather.  Monteblanco’s 18 hectares sit on the crest of a hill, with the wet and dry mill at the top and slopes of coffee planted below.

In 2002, Rodrigo participated in a local program teaching local children of coffee producers to cup.  Before that, he and his family had never considered coffee in terms of cup profile.  By learning to differentiate profiles, he and his father and grandfather were able to able to make the connections between the farming techniques they applied and coffee’s attributes in the cup.

At this time, Rodrigo also began to learn about cupping competitions that evaluate the best lots from farms in a region.  He noticed that farms would win one year and then never again, so he decided to investigate how to produce quality coffee consistently.  This led him to explore the trees planted on Monteblanco, were he discovered various cultivars his grandfather had planted in the 1980’s.

One of these varieties is Purple Caturra, a type of Caturra whose cherries ripen to a deep purple color.  All cherries harvested are measured for degrees Brix. Based on sugar content indicated, the team at Aromas del Sur, the umbrella group of Monteblanco, Progreso, and La Loma farms, then designates which processing method is appropriate.  Coffees with 24-27 degrees Brix are processed as washed coffees, beginning with depulping cherries they day they are harvested.

Coffee is fermented between 28 and 32 hours, fully washed with clean water, transferred to the solar dryer for several days, and finally moved to shaded raised beds to complete the drying process. Floaters are removed at the first stage prior to pulping to produce clean, consistent coffees that represent the terroir of the farm.

Rodrigo is proud that he, his wife Claudia Samboni, farm manager Don Gerardo, and the team that works in the fields and at the mill have reached the goal of achieving consistent quality. Each harvest, Finca Monteblanco produces micro-lots that serve as competition coffees around the world, but the farm also consistently produces containers of delicious coffees that appear year-round on café menus and retail shelves.  By applying an ethic of rigorous monitoring, planning, and management of each stage of production and processing, all coffees from Monteblanco showcase their full potential.

Harvesting and processing on Monteblanco have evolved with the times, adapting to a changing climate that yields harvest dispersed through ten months of the year rather than in a concentrated peak.

Antonio Cezar Junior measures degrees Brix
best light roast Colombian coffee
Rodrigo Sanchez on Finca Monteblanco
Young coffee shrubs on Finca Monteblanco
Rodrigo shows Edson Tamekuni the shaded African drying beds
Brazilian coffee team visits Finca Monteblanco

La Meseta Colombia

La Meseta Colombia

About La Meseta: The coffee tradition of our country and especially the central coffee-growing region has lead this family group to create, for more than 25 years, a beautiful plantation farm of Colombian soft coffee, blended with the richest flavors and aromas that Colombian mountains have to offer. We also have the tenacity and strength of the region’s hardest working people who contribute to reach our shared objective.

Crop: 2018
Variety: Geisha
Elevation: 2000m
Fragrance: Honey, Floral
Tasting notes: Notes of peach, apricot, tangerine, delicate body
Price: $22.50/340g




What’s a Geisha?
It’s not Japanese!  It’s a coffee variety.  In wine, the analogy might be pinot noir variety.
From another-jim over at home barista:

All Gesha/Geishas are a single coffee varietal introduced into Central America in the 1930s from a Kenyan nursery, which had produced it from Ethiopian seed stocks of unknown origin. It was initially widely planted because it was purported to have superior resistance to some of the then common coffee diseases. However, this was not true, so the varietal was never replanted. Nevertheless, some of it survived by growing from the berries of the originally planted trees. How much these trees changed and hybridized in the few generations since the 1930s is unknown.

The Peterson’s discovered a stand of Geishas on their farm in 2005 (I think), and won the Panamanian COE hands down with a lot taken only from those trees. The lot also set a record at auction. The taste of the coffee was that of a southern Ethiopian coffees, but without the interfering tannin flavors usual in many southern Ethiopian coffees and with a very pleasant sweetness instead. So the hunt was on for these trees, and more were discovered in forgotten corners of central American coffee plantations. The resulting plantings are maturing now, so we are getting a lot of new Geisha/Geshas offerings.

“Geisha” is the actual name given to the coffee in the Kenyan nursery that exported them to Central America. People looking for the original varietal in Ethiopia speculated that the Geisha name was a misnomer for the Gesha province in Ethiopia, so they started using what they assumed was the correct version of the name, “Gesha.” However, none of the coffee varietals located till now in the Gesha province are anything like the Geisha; so the Gesha name may be a complete misnomer, and the original nursery may have called it Geisha for some completely different reason.

About the Producer
In our Company, pay equality is preached, this principle ensures worker’s special protection in decent and fair conditions; therefore, we practice equality.

One of our Company’s greatest objective is to propagate the necessary conditions to attract and train workers with qualified job skills that can enable them to contribute and achieve our Company’s main goals. To accomplish this, our work environment is based on the principles of respect, mutual collaboration and permanent communication.

Our facilities are designed to provide the greatest comfort for our workers, with lodgings, showers, restrooms; complete and healthy meals, and above all, each of our employees is fairly treated.

All of the aforementioned creates affinity from the workers towards the Company’s farms which are characterized by a young, productive and technified coffee-culture.

Cafe Pionero Ecuador honey

Café Pionero ensures that small-scale farmers receive fair prices for their coffee.  Created by Jenny Zambrano after an earthquake hit her village in 2016, Café Pionero has created direct-trade between remote villages in the Andes Mountains and coffee lovers in Canada.  This has resulted in better pay for the farmers, training and education seminars on sustainable farming practices, and employment opportunities – including some of the only paid jobs for women in Jenny’s village.  Café Pionero aims to create lasting relationships, ensuring fairly traded coffee year after year.Special coffee,

Crop: 2018
Region: Manabi, Ecuador
Process: Honey
Fragrance: Pear
Tasting notes: Juicy pear, Peach, Mango, Caramel
Price: $16.99 / 400 g